Lance Armstrong’s Retirement from Cycling

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A group of people riding on the back of a bicycle

After two comebacks, seven Tour De France wins, and many allegations of doping, Lance Armstrong officially announced that he is retiring from cycling, again. This time, however, will be for good. According to Armstrong, age has finally caught up with him. He does not want to continue competing in a sport he used to dominate in hopes of recapturing the glory days, when he knows they will never return.

Armstrong rose to fame in 1999 when he won his first Tour De France. Three years before, Armstrong was diagnosed with testicular cancer. The cancer had become so severe that by the time doctors discovered it, it had spread to his brain; they gave him little chance to survive, let alone compete in cycling again. Instead of giving up, Armstrong used his cancer as an impetus for further success. In 1997 he started the Lance Armstrong Foundation, raising funds for cancer research. The first foundation sponsored event raised $10,000. Today, the foundation has risen close to $400 million in total.

From relatively humble beginnings, Armstrong has become one of the most recognized figures worldwide. He also had a stint on skating, so if you are looking for best skates online, now is your time.  His cycling has allowed him to be an advocate for cancer research. Not only does he have his foundation, but he also has lobbied for a constitutional amendment for additional money for cancer research from the Texas legislation, and is scheduled to collaborate with the California legislation and meet in front of the United Nations General Assembly.

With Armstrong’s success has also inevitably brought enemies. For every record he broke, there were many doubters. The man has been tested for doping more than any other athlete, each time coming up clean. The latest challenge is by disgraced 2006 Tour de France champion Floyd Landis. Landis argues that Armstrong learned ways to fool doping tests and taught other cyclists the same. Are these the words of a jealous former rival or an insider? Only time will tell. In the end, this article was written for you Lance Armstrong. Thank you for your tenacity to never quit. Without your work, cancer research or cycling would not be the same.

Source: New York Times

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