Golf: Reasons Why You Should Work the Ball

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A man throwing a frisbee at the park

Golf is not a game that rewards unnecessary risks and silly thoughts. There isn’t any point to just curving the ball back and forth, or hitting it high or low using clubs from https://www.golf-clubs.com/, if you don’t get some sort of tan¬gible bonus from doing so.

The first place it will reward you is a result of the way a golf course is set up. They don’t cut every hole on the right side of the green, nor do they cut every hole on the left side of the green. In the same manner, the various holes call for you to place your tee shots on different sides of a hole.

Why not just hit it straight all the time, you might ask? Well, if you can hit the ball straight every time, you’re wasting your time reading a book, because we can’t hit the ball straight every time. When you can effec¬tively work the ball, you give yourself a better chance of getting the ball to end up where you want it. If you set up to curve the ball a certain way and you pull it off, you’re in good shape. If you don’t pull it off, more than likely you’ll hit it straight. It doesn’t work out this way every time, but the odds are pretty good in your favor.

Let’s try an example to make things a little more clear. You have a 9-iron in your hand and the hole is cut on the middle left of a green. If you can draw the ball-curve it just a little bit from right to left-you have a decent chance of getting the ball close to the hole without increasing your risk at all. What you do is aim at the middle of the green. If you execute the draw perfectly, you knock it stiff. If you hit the ball straight, you have a 20-footer. And it’s unlikely you’ll hang it out to the right. As we said, it does happen, but not all that often.

Right there you learned the first rule of working the ball: Never aim at a point where, if you hit the ball straight, you’ll end up in trouble. Always aim at a spot where the result will be just fine if you hit the ball straight. In fact, you’re almost always right when you decide to aim at the middle of the green. In the above example, even if you push the ball you’ll just have a fairly long putt.

Another reason you want to be able to control the ball in flight has to do with the depth of the hole position on the green. If the pin is in the back, you can bring the ball in low and it has a chance to bounce back to the hole. If it holds when it hits, then you have a medium range putt. Same goes for a pin in the front of the green. If you bring it in high and beyond the hole, it might spin back to the hole If it holds, you still have a run at a makeable putt. In both cases, the controlled shot is less risky than flying the ball right at the hole.

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